Ennis Fine Furniture

maximalism designed living room space

To the Max!

To the Max!

In the process of enduring lockdowns with sanity intact, we have rediscovered the inherent value of having a space that one can distinctly call their own. The world has changed, you along with it, and now that you are perceiving your home under this fresh, new light, you are probably thinking that it could do with some updating, too. Perhaps some inventive choices that will keep your personal flair but will also push your look into new dimensions.

Adopting a new design can be quite the undertaking, but fear not: the latest approach tends not to focus on what we want to rid ourselves of and replace with, but rely more on what we already have (and lots of it!) and how it relates to our personal history. But how can it be said that trends are wanting a new, fresh look when the idea is based largely on a connection to the past? Most likely this is due to our collective time spent indoors over the last 12-plus months, perusing all of our memorabilia of times well-lived. Thanks to this, the things that have given us definition to our memories are now being displayed and celebrated not only for nostalgia’s sake, but for gratitude’s as well.

This emphasis on personality and character has bucked the Marie Kondo ideology of the last few years and has instead resurfaced an older, historic school of art thought known as “Maximalism”. Essentially, maximalism is the opposite of minimalism: instead of “less is more,” “more is more!” Now that may sound obvious, but maximalism has only recently bled from other realms of art into interior design; while the priority may appear to be just on “more stuff,” the true aesthetic hinges instead on placement and complexity. Vibrancy of appearance and shape, pattern repetition and variety have their roles to play as well, not to mention an item’s story; how it relates to you or how you acquired it.

Bar none, a maximalist room should be visually arresting when it is entered; the space needs to be layered thickly with pieces that feature intricate patterns, designs, textures and bold hues woven into an idiosyncratic visual theme reflecting your personality. Items should be of varying material, but preferably hearty, well-made objects and ornate, handmade, eclectic ones. While abundance is key, try to keep from too many adornments as the format has a reputation for being cluttered or “busy.”

We suggest a small area or room to start. Proceed by layering color, then patterns and then work outwardly with larger items. To help you manage the style, or contain it to a single location, a Tradewinds Bookcase or Stickley Book Rack would make a great base for a maximalist collage, or as an addition to one already in-progress. Throw cushions, plants and books are easy to accessorize and provide a great place to begin. Not sure where to go from here? Stop in to one of our Ennis Fine Furniture showrooms and our staff of professional designers can consult you on maximalism, or any design you wish to pursue!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.



 
Click Here to Submit
close-link